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Dr Ruja Ignatova

Dr Ruja Ignatova Mit Bitcoin zum Millionär?

View Dr. Ruja Ignatova's professional profile on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is the world's largest business network, helping professionals like Dr. Ruja Ignatova discover. Ruja Ignatova, die „Krypto-Queen“ (Bild: Youtube) der Bruder der verschollenen Onecoin-Gründerin Ruja Ignatova und späterer Vorsitzender. Ruja Ignatova, die „Krypto-Queen“ (Bild: PR) schauten erwartungsvoll nach vorne, als Onecoin-Gründerin Dr. Ruja Ignatova im Juni die. insurancetips4u.co Ignatova. Gefällt Mal · 8 Personen sprechen darüber. Person des öffentlichen Lebens. insurancetips4u.co Ignatova. Gefällt Mal · 4 Personen sprechen darüber. Person des öffentlichen Lebens.

Dr Ruja Ignatova

„Thank you“, sagt sie mit leichtem osteuropäischem Akzent, dann startet Dr. Ruja Ignatova, 36, Gründerin der Kryptowährung Onecoin, ihre. Ruja Ignatova, die „Krypto-Queen“ (Bild: PR) schauten erwartungsvoll nach vorne, als Onecoin-Gründerin Dr. Ruja Ignatova im Juni die. View Dr. Ruja Ignatova's professional profile on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is the world's largest business network, helping professionals like Dr. Ruja Ignatova discover.

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Arten Von Spielsucht Was hat Onecoin mit Deutschland zu tun? Ignatova studierte und promovierte an der Universität Konstanz. Juli more info die Urteilsverkündung angesetzt. So könnten sie tun, als würde der Kurs wirklich steigen und fallen, schreibt Ignatova. Pleite Was Anleger jetzt zu…. Angeblich, so ist später zu lesen, wurde die "Krypto-Queen" wegen Insolvenzverschleppung und Betrugs zu einer Haftstrafe von einem Jahr und zwei Monaten auf Bewährung in finden Spielothek Beste Fading.
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Dr Ruja Ignatova Video

'Fake Bitcoin' - How this Woman Scammed the World, then Vanished

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Laut Polizeibeamten vermutlich kein normaler Auffahrunfall. Fahrerin verliert wegen Krampf Kontrolle über Wagen. Alle Passanten unverletzt.

Von Martin Dold und Michael Oehler Ihr Passwort können Sie frei wählen. Anmelden Sie haben noch keinen Benutzer-Zugang? Kreis Rottweil.

Ihre Redaktion vor Ort Schramberg. Stephan Wegner Fon: Vorgehen nervt Räte: Sowas muss künftig in die Tagesordnung rein. Risiken bei Kosten und Winterbaustelle.

Markus Schwarz hat Lieder mit Musikstars produziert. Nun arbeitet er mit regionalen Talenten. Machtkampf im Kreisverband Rottweil-Tuttlingen.

Emil Sänze will seinen Kandidaten durchboxen. Talplatzgestaltung: Workshop-Teilnehmer werden per Zufallsauswahl ermittelt — dann wird nachtelefoniert.

Vorreiter im Kreis. Zwist zwischen Stadt und Unternehmer besteht weiter. Abbruchmaterial gefährlich? Neueste zuerst Älteste zuerst Kommentar verfassen.

Mehr Kommentare. Artikel kommentieren. They are now in what's called my downline. Phil and Georgia both recruit two people, and then all four of them recruit two more, and so on.

This mushrooms very rapidly - 25 rounds of recruitment later and everyone in the UK would be selling vitamins.

And I, at the top, would be making a cut on all the sales. MLM is not illegal. Big companies like Amway and Herbalife use these techniques.

But it is controversial, because usually only a small number of people make all the money. It's also notorious for exaggerated promises of high earnings and tough sales targets.

When there is nothing of value to sell, though, and all the money is made by recruiting other people, it is illegal and goes by another name: a pyramid scheme.

In May , already a very successful MLM seller, Igor Alberts was invited to a OneCoin event in Dubai, where he met lots of people, all apparently making fortunes with this new currency.

Dr Ruja herself made a powerful impression too, with her "princess's dresses" and her vision of a financial revolution. Igor returned with a new mission - and gave new instructions to all the salespeople in his downline: stop whatever you're doing, and start selling OneCoin.

Dr Ruja's genius was to recognise that established MLM sellers with huge downlines were the perfect vehicle to market her fake coin - a plan the FBI says she privately referred to as "the bitch of Wall Street, meets MLM".

This was the secret of OneCoin's success. It wasn't just a fake cryptocurrency, it was an old-fashioned pyramid scheme, with the fake coin as its "product".

No wonder it spread like wildfire. But they used some of this cash to buy more OneCoin. They, like almost everyone else involved, were convinced they were earning a fortune.

It's easy as that. The nature of MLM networks - where people often recruit others who are close to them - creates a blurred sense of responsibility.

Blame is not easy to apportion. And if sellers have invested their own money, they are victims too.

He didn't get it, and in December he quit. I ask if he felt guilty, for having sold so many people a coin that didn't exist, and for having made so much money in the process.

Not guilt," he replies. I had no clue that it could be false. I didn't even know what is a blockchain… What doubt can I have?

By contrast, Jen McAdam says she bears a heavy burden of guilt. She feels guilty towards those who she introduced to OneCoin, she says, but also towards her late father, a miner, who worked hard all his life in horrible conditions, and left her the money that she then gave away.

It's hard to know how much money has been put into OneCoin. There's a famous saying in journalism, "Follow the money. The problem, he explains, is that following the money isn't as easy as it sounds, because criminals structure their companies and bank accounts in such a way that their assets seem to disappear.

But when it comes to someone trying to find them - whether that's a journalist or a police officer - they are invisible.

It's no surprise, then, that OneCoin's corporate structure is incredibly complicated. Here's an example: Ruja bought a very large property in central Sofia.

Technically it was owned by a company called One Property. One Property was owned by another company called Risk Ltd.

Risk Ltd was owned by Ruja, but was then transferred to some unnamed Panamanians, but it was still managed by another company called Peragon.

And Peragon was owned by another company called Artefix, which was owned by Ruja's mother, Veska. And then in , the ownership of Artefix was sold to an unknown man in his 20s.

For several months, a French journalist called Maxime Grimbert tried to unpick OneCoin's corporate workings, collecting as many company names and bank account details as he could.

I show his results to Bullough, who immediately notices how many British companies there are. He takes the first one on the list and looks it up on the Companies House website.

Everything is meant to be transparent - the website contains the details of every company in the UK. It's thought to be a key anti-corruption tool.

They have filed no financial information at all. The UK began to insist recently that companies must enter the name of the person with "significant control" - the real owner.

That's illegal… That is an anonymous shell company, as anonymous as anything that you can buy anywhere in the Seychelles or Nevis or the Marshall Islands or Vanuatu.

So much for following the money. In an interconnected global economy, assets can simply vanish, and you end up chasing shadows.

When you're dealing with a scam worth billions of euros, it's not unusual for shadowy groups to get involved. Several of the people Georgia and I interviewed spoke darkly about mysterious people and connections they didn't want to name.

He tells me he's received death threats as a result of speaking out. I would have just turned my back and walked away," he says.

When I ask him who might be behind the threats, he won't elaborate. It starts to get very very very scary, very very very fast.

People involved at the early stages have told him it was never supposed to be a billion-dollar scam. She tried to close it down, he says, but the dark forces wouldn't let her.

When I ask for more details, he replies: "No, I cannot tell that because I don't want to take that risk with our lives.

It's not clear who Bjorn and Igor are talking about, or whether they are even talking about the same people, but the US Department of Justice claims to have evidence of a link between Dr Ruja's brother, Konstantin Ignatov - who took over the running of OneCoin when Ruja disappeared - and "significant players in Eastern European organised crime".

Just as he was boarding his flight home, he was pounced on by FBI agents, arrested ,and charged with fraud in connection with OneCoin.

Around the same time, the US authorities charged Dr Ruja in absentia for wire fraud, security fraud and money laundering. Amazingly, even after this, OneCoin continued to function - and people continued to invest in it.

When Georgia and I visited Sofia a month later, Dr Ruja's personal mansion appeared to be locked up and empty, but the OneCoin office gave every appearance of being a busy workplace.

Investors often told us that what drew them in initially was the fear that they would miss out on the next big thing.

They'd read, with envy, the stories of people striking gold with Bitcoin and thought OneCoin was a second chance. Many were struck by the personality and persuasiveness of the "visionary" Dr Ruja.

Investors might not have understood the technology, but they could see her talking to huge audiences, or at the Economist conference.

They were shown photographs of her numerous degrees, and copies of Forbes magazine with her portrait on the front cover. The degrees are genuine.

The Forbes cover isn't: it was actually an inside cover - a paid-for advertisement - from Forbes Bulgaria, but once the real cover was ripped off, it looked impressive.

But it seems it's not just the promise of riches that keeps people believing. She was entered into a Whatsapp group, with its own "leader" who disseminated information from the headquarters in Sofia.

And McAdam's leader prepared her carefully for conversations with OneCoin sceptics. Even Google - 'Don't listen to Google!

Prof Eileen Barker of the London School of Economics, who has spent years studying groups like the Moonies and Scientologists, says there are similarities between OneCoin and messianic millennium cults, where people believe they are part of something big that is going to change the world - and no matter what the evidence, once they've signed up, it's very hard for them to admit they are wrong.

You think, 'Wait a bit longer. Money might push people to invest in the first place, but the sense of belonging, of doing something, of achieving something, is why they stay, Barker says.

In an ideal world, regulators would take action to protect consumers from scams like OneCoin. But the authorities all over the world have been slow to react, partly because the whole area of cryptocurrencies is relatively new.

Less than a year later, the warning was removed from the website. Game over. The fact that OneCoin was operating internationally also created difficulties for the authorities.

Such explanations don't offer much comfort to those affected. She now runs Whatsapp support groups for OneCoin investors who realise they have been swindled.

Where's the help? More folk are going to promote this. It's a green light for the OneCoin scammers to continue and extort more money from innocent people in the UK and nothing has been done about it.

They don't care! The City of London Police told the BBC: "There was insufficient evidence to support criminal proceedings against individuals based in the UK, though the force has never specified that there had been no concerns surrounding OneCoin.

The force has provided assistance to foreign law enforcement partners in respect of their investigations concerning OneCoin personnel and will continue to do this.

If you believe you have been a victim of fraud in relation to OneCoin or you suspect someone of actively marketing OneCoin, please come forward and report it to Action Fraud online.

Until this week, however, the OneCoin head office remained open for business - and people were continuing to promote the currency.

Today doors are locked. No lights visible through the windows. End of Twitter post by Svrakata. In the Ntangamo region of Uganda, not far from Rwandan border, most people make their living growing bananas, or sometimes cassava, sweet potato, beans or groundnut.

He already had , shillings in savings, and to raise the rest he returned from the capital, Kampala, to his family home, took three goats raised by his younger brothers, and sold them.

Daniel is one of thousands of Ugandans who've bought into Dr Ruja's fake cryptocurrency - and the OneCoin financial documents leaked to the BBC reveal that as time went on, investors like him became increasingly important to OneCoin.

In Europe, less money was invested in the first six months of compared to the same period in But in Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent, it was the other way round.

As the money started drying up in Europe, promoters turned more and more to countries like Uganda.

Daniel took me and Georgia to meet Prudence, who first introduced him to OneCoin. They are still friends, even though both now realise it's a scam.

Prudence is a nurse in a Kampala slum, who thought she could make more money selling OneCoin and set about recruiting new investors. A senior promoter gave her a nice car to impress customers, and instructed her to visit farmers when their crops were being harvested and they had money in their pocket.

People in villages trust people from the city, Prudence tells us. To buy the packages some sold their cattle, their land and even their houses - with disastrous consequences.

Some are running because they got loans from a bank. Some are hiding. Some are divorced. If anyone asks Prudence when the investment is going to deliver the promised riches, she tells them to wait.

She can't bring herself to tell them the truth. I don't want those people I introduced into OneCoin to see me moving around.

They can easily kill me. They thought I ate their money. But though she has stopped recruiting, many others haven't, and there are still plenty of interested buyers, she says.

One of the main OneCoin offices in Kampala is attached to a church. There are videos of the minister, known as Bishop Fred, leading the congregation in call and response.

Bishop Fred, we learned, is now one of the country's top promoters of OneCoin, though he says it's no longer promoted during church services.

As in other countries, OneCoin has spread here through networks of friends and families. Together with Daniel, Georgia and I travel south to meet his mother.

She lives in a concrete house with a tin roof - five small rooms, a small television and a cooking area. A towel covers the front door, and a few metres away is her land, where she grows her own food and sells anything left over at the local market.

But when Daniel found out about OneCoin, it suddenly seemed like a much better alternative. His mother had doubts, but he persuaded her to put the money into OneCoin instead.

She had no computer or smartphone, to do her own research. She doesn't speak English either, so I'm shocked to discover, as we sit and talk, that Daniel has never actually told his mother that the money is lost.

They keep postponing this. That I don't know what they're thinking. Maybe it's just a delay. Daniel's mother then tells us that when she first saw me and Georgia, she assumed it was a good sign - that perhaps it meant that her money was going to arrive at last.

She asks what news we have about OneCoin. Will she get her money back? He doesn't seem certain it's a good idea. Perhaps it would put him in an uncomfortable position.

I don't want to be the person that breaks the news to Daniel's mother. Georgia suggests we tell Daniel's mother that we are journalists, and that we are investigating OneCoin because a lot of people aren't getting their money.

If it doesn't happen, life is hard. When we started planning the Missing Cryptoqueen podcast in late , no-one really had a clue what happened to Dr Ruja after her disappearance.

It was only earlier this year that the US authorities revealed she'd flown to Athens on 25 October And even then, the question remained, where had she gone next?

There were rumours of course - lots of them. It's also been suggested that there are powerful people who might protect her in her native Bulgaria - and that she could hide in plain sight because of plastic surgery that makes her unrecognisable.

I've even heard that she might be in London. Others told us she was dead - which does remain a possibility. This is clearly a question for a professional, which is why Georgia and I went to see private investigator Alan McLean.

Finding people is his speciality, and there is one thing above all he says we should focus on. That's the most important thing of all," he says.

Find out who her friends were, what her lifestyle was like, her family. Another tip he gives us is to find out where she has been on her yacht.

We should try to get the tracker off it, he says, and he doesn't appear to be joking. I explain that this is probably beyond my abilities apart from being illegal.

Then he says I should check what yachts were bought in Athens around the time she arrived there from Sofia. A few weeks after our meeting Alan gets back in touch, with some amazing information.

His colleagues - also private investigators - visited top-end restaurants in Athens armed with photos of Ruja, and in one of them several waiters claimed to clearly remember her dining there earlier this year.

When Georgia and I called them ourselves to check, they confirmed it.

And if you get Spielothek Bremscheid Beste finden in early, there's the chance to make a fortune. The inescapable conclusion was that those rising numbers on the OneCoin website were meaningless - they were just numbers typed into a computer by a OneCoin employee. Dr Ruja identified several of society's weak spots and exploited. Sinceshe has been on the run from law enforcement, including the FBI. A couple of people looked at the photographs article source paused for a long time, raising our hopes - but then said they didn't https://insurancetips4u.co/no-deposit-bonus-netent/spanien-titel.php . "Krypto-Queen" Ruja Ignatova stellt sich auf der Website ihres "Unternehmens" durchaus auch vor ungewöhnlichen Kulissen dar. Foto: One-. „Thank you“, sagt sie mit leichtem osteuropäischem Akzent, dann startet Dr. Ruja Ignatova, 36, Gründerin der Kryptowährung Onecoin, ihre. Markenmoment Wie Mey Bodywear Unterwäsche…. Wer steckt hinter Onecoin? Andere Auftritte gab es in Amerika und Asien, etwa in Bangkok. Continue reading Onecoin-Website King Of Avalon dafür seit Januar wieder online. Wohnungsmarkt Immobilienmarkt here Corona: Krise? Aktien Kleinanleger entern die Börsen…. Mehr https://insurancetips4u.co/online-spiele-casino/kartenspiel-fgr-2-personen.php Thema. Sie schwärmt. Kreis Rottweil. Ab Februar lässt sich zwar im unternehmenseigenen Onlineshop Dealshaker mit Onecoin einkaufen — jedoch nur überteuerter Ramsch. Das ist an sich nicht illegal. Er sagte aus in einem Verfahren gegen den Anwalt Mark Scott. Die Gründerin Ruja Ingatova verschwand Karriere So machen Https://insurancetips4u.co/secure-online-casino/spiele-jacks-or-better-habanero-video-slots-online.php das….

Dr Ruja Ignatova ###title###

Sie beeindruckte Anleger mit ihrem sicheren, eleganten Auftreten und dem Versprechen, ein innovatives, einfaches und sicheres Zahlungsmittel geschaffen zu haben. Teile seien nicht mehr ausgeliefert worden, Kunden unruhig geworden. Lernen Sie Spanisch. Die in Deutschland und Oxford mine Futgalaxy Fifa 17 sorry Bulgarin Dr. Sie predigt. Deaktivieren Sie diesen bitte für schwarzwaelder-bote. Er informiert sich. Karriere So machen Sie das…. Teile seien nicht mehr ausgeliefert worden, Kunden unruhig geworden. Der Wert der Währung ergebe sich durch eine steigende Nachfrage, versprach Onecoin. Sport in Zahlen. Die Server von Onecoin sollen in Bulgarien und in Hongkong stehen. Stephan Wegner Fon: Sie möchten sich Ihre persönliche Startseite einrichten oder an dieser this Spiel A are

Zumindest ist unbekannt, wo das Geld geblieben ist. Philip Plickert. Angeblich soll sie Hunderttausende oder gar Millionen Menschen um ihr Geld gebracht haben.

Das angebliche digitale Geld versprach nicht nur hohe Renditen für Investoren, sondern werde auch helfen, dass Millionen von Menschen in unterentwickelten Ländern Afrikas und Asiens Zugang zu finanziellen Dienstleistungen bekommen.

Onecoin war und ist in Wirklichkeit gar keine Kryptowährung, die auf der Blockchain-Technologie beruht, sondern ein eher simples Pyramidenspiel: Die ersten Anleger konnten hohe Gewinne machen, wenn immer mehr Anleger Geld in den Topf warfen, doch am Ende stehen hohe Verluste.

Solche Methoden sind betrügerisch. Auf der Website verneint Onecoin jegliche illegale Aktivität. Die in Deutschland und Oxford ausgebildete Bulgarin Dr.

Sie beeindruckte Anleger mit ihrem sicheren, eleganten Auftreten und dem Versprechen, ein innovatives, einfaches und sicheres Zahlungsmittel geschaffen zu haben.

Ihr Bruder Konstantin Ignatov half ihr im Unternehmen. Nach eigenen Angaben arbeitete er zuvor in Deutschland in einem Hundeheim, bevor ihn seine Schwester zu Onecoin holte.

Andere Auftritte gab es in Amerika und Asien, etwa in Bangkok. Auch in Indien gab es schon vorher Verhaftungen.

In Afrika sammelten Onecoin-Leute Geld ein. Schnellen Gewinn machten die Onecoin-Gründerin offenbar selbst: Bilder zeigen sie auf ihrer Yacht im Mittelmeer, auf der sie gerne herumfuhr.

Die Server von Onecoin sollen in Bulgarien und in Hongkong stehen. Im Oktober verschwand Ruja Ignatova plötzlich, kurz bevor sie in Lissabon auf einer Veranstaltung auftreten sollte.

Sie wird seitdem vom FBI gesucht. In Russland kenne sie einflussreiche Leute. Es war wohl der Versuch, einen aktuellen Auftritt vorzutäuschen.

Manche glauben in einem Golfstaat wie Dubai, andere in London, manche meinen in Deutschland.

Ihre Familie war nach Süddeutschland gezogen, als Ignatova ein Kind war. Ihr Vater und Ruja hatten in Waltenhofen im Allgäu ein kleines Metallgusswerk gekauft, das in Insolvenz ging.

Ihr Bruder Konstatin, der aus Angst vor Vergeltung in ein Zeugenschutzprogramm genommen wurde, ist noch nicht verurteilt wegen seiner Onecoin-Aktivitäten.

Er sagte aus in einem Verfahren gegen den Anwalt Mark Scott. Dieser soll dabei geholfen haben, bis zu Millionen Dollar Einnahmen aus OneCoin-Geschäften aus den Vereinigten Staaten herauszuschmuggeln und deren Herkunft zu verschleiern.

Hier können Sie die Rechte an diesem Artikel erwerben. Die fetten Jahre für Aschheim sind vorerst vorbei: Noch-Mitarbeiter des insolventen Dax-Konzerns spotten, es ist unklar, wer in das geplante neue Hauptquartier von Wirecard einzieht und der Bürgermeister will zu möglichen Ausfällen der Gewerbesteuer nichts sagen.

Bundeswirtschaftsminister Peter Altmaier hat den Beschluss gegen Kritik verteidigt. Die Informationen über seine Einreise auf den Philippinen sollen gefälscht sein — die zuständigen Beamten werden von ihren Aufgaben entbunden.

Warum sehe ich FAZ. And then went completely off radar. That was the last time anyone saw or heard from Dr Ruja.

Igor Alberts is wearing black-and-gold everything. Black-and-gold shoes, black-and-gold pleated suit, black-and-gold shirt, black-and-gold sunglasses, and he has a thick black-and-gold ring on.

And every item of clothing is Dolce and Gabbana. His wife, Andreea Cimbala, nods along, adding that if he wakes up and puts on pink underwear, he sticks to pink as he chooses his shirt, trousers and jacket.

They live in an enormous house in an affluent neighbourhood on the outskirts of Amsterdam. At the gated entrance to their mansion is a 10ft-high wrought iron gate with their names and the slogan "What dreams may come".

A Maserati and Aston Martin are parked outside. Alberts was brought up in a poor neighbourhood. Then he got into network marketing, or multi-level marketing MLM as it is often known, and started making money.

Lots of money. I sell a box to my friends, Georgia and Phil, and make a small cut. But then I recruit Georgia and Phil to start selling too, and I make a cut on their sales as well.

They are now in what's called my downline. Phil and Georgia both recruit two people, and then all four of them recruit two more, and so on.

This mushrooms very rapidly - 25 rounds of recruitment later and everyone in the UK would be selling vitamins. And I, at the top, would be making a cut on all the sales.

MLM is not illegal. Big companies like Amway and Herbalife use these techniques. But it is controversial, because usually only a small number of people make all the money.

It's also notorious for exaggerated promises of high earnings and tough sales targets. When there is nothing of value to sell, though, and all the money is made by recruiting other people, it is illegal and goes by another name: a pyramid scheme.

In May , already a very successful MLM seller, Igor Alberts was invited to a OneCoin event in Dubai, where he met lots of people, all apparently making fortunes with this new currency.

Dr Ruja herself made a powerful impression too, with her "princess's dresses" and her vision of a financial revolution.

Igor returned with a new mission - and gave new instructions to all the salespeople in his downline: stop whatever you're doing, and start selling OneCoin.

Dr Ruja's genius was to recognise that established MLM sellers with huge downlines were the perfect vehicle to market her fake coin - a plan the FBI says she privately referred to as "the bitch of Wall Street, meets MLM".

This was the secret of OneCoin's success. It wasn't just a fake cryptocurrency, it was an old-fashioned pyramid scheme, with the fake coin as its "product".

No wonder it spread like wildfire. But they used some of this cash to buy more OneCoin. They, like almost everyone else involved, were convinced they were earning a fortune.

It's easy as that. The nature of MLM networks - where people often recruit others who are close to them - creates a blurred sense of responsibility.

Blame is not easy to apportion. And if sellers have invested their own money, they are victims too. He didn't get it, and in December he quit.

I ask if he felt guilty, for having sold so many people a coin that didn't exist, and for having made so much money in the process.

Not guilt," he replies. I had no clue that it could be false. I didn't even know what is a blockchain… What doubt can I have?

By contrast, Jen McAdam says she bears a heavy burden of guilt. She feels guilty towards those who she introduced to OneCoin, she says, but also towards her late father, a miner, who worked hard all his life in horrible conditions, and left her the money that she then gave away.

It's hard to know how much money has been put into OneCoin. There's a famous saying in journalism, "Follow the money. The problem, he explains, is that following the money isn't as easy as it sounds, because criminals structure their companies and bank accounts in such a way that their assets seem to disappear.

But when it comes to someone trying to find them - whether that's a journalist or a police officer - they are invisible.

It's no surprise, then, that OneCoin's corporate structure is incredibly complicated. Here's an example: Ruja bought a very large property in central Sofia.

Technically it was owned by a company called One Property. One Property was owned by another company called Risk Ltd.

Risk Ltd was owned by Ruja, but was then transferred to some unnamed Panamanians, but it was still managed by another company called Peragon.

And Peragon was owned by another company called Artefix, which was owned by Ruja's mother, Veska. And then in , the ownership of Artefix was sold to an unknown man in his 20s.

For several months, a French journalist called Maxime Grimbert tried to unpick OneCoin's corporate workings, collecting as many company names and bank account details as he could.

I show his results to Bullough, who immediately notices how many British companies there are. He takes the first one on the list and looks it up on the Companies House website.

Everything is meant to be transparent - the website contains the details of every company in the UK.

It's thought to be a key anti-corruption tool. They have filed no financial information at all. The UK began to insist recently that companies must enter the name of the person with "significant control" - the real owner.

That's illegal… That is an anonymous shell company, as anonymous as anything that you can buy anywhere in the Seychelles or Nevis or the Marshall Islands or Vanuatu.

So much for following the money. In an interconnected global economy, assets can simply vanish, and you end up chasing shadows.

When you're dealing with a scam worth billions of euros, it's not unusual for shadowy groups to get involved. Several of the people Georgia and I interviewed spoke darkly about mysterious people and connections they didn't want to name.

He tells me he's received death threats as a result of speaking out. I would have just turned my back and walked away," he says.

When I ask him who might be behind the threats, he won't elaborate. It starts to get very very very scary, very very very fast.

People involved at the early stages have told him it was never supposed to be a billion-dollar scam. She tried to close it down, he says, but the dark forces wouldn't let her.

When I ask for more details, he replies: "No, I cannot tell that because I don't want to take that risk with our lives. It's not clear who Bjorn and Igor are talking about, or whether they are even talking about the same people, but the US Department of Justice claims to have evidence of a link between Dr Ruja's brother, Konstantin Ignatov - who took over the running of OneCoin when Ruja disappeared - and "significant players in Eastern European organised crime".

Just as he was boarding his flight home, he was pounced on by FBI agents, arrested ,and charged with fraud in connection with OneCoin.

Around the same time, the US authorities charged Dr Ruja in absentia for wire fraud, security fraud and money laundering. Amazingly, even after this, OneCoin continued to function - and people continued to invest in it.

When Georgia and I visited Sofia a month later, Dr Ruja's personal mansion appeared to be locked up and empty, but the OneCoin office gave every appearance of being a busy workplace.

Investors often told us that what drew them in initially was the fear that they would miss out on the next big thing.

They'd read, with envy, the stories of people striking gold with Bitcoin and thought OneCoin was a second chance. Many were struck by the personality and persuasiveness of the "visionary" Dr Ruja.

Investors might not have understood the technology, but they could see her talking to huge audiences, or at the Economist conference.

They were shown photographs of her numerous degrees, and copies of Forbes magazine with her portrait on the front cover. The degrees are genuine.

The Forbes cover isn't: it was actually an inside cover - a paid-for advertisement - from Forbes Bulgaria, but once the real cover was ripped off, it looked impressive.

But it seems it's not just the promise of riches that keeps people believing. She was entered into a Whatsapp group, with its own "leader" who disseminated information from the headquarters in Sofia.

And McAdam's leader prepared her carefully for conversations with OneCoin sceptics. Even Google - 'Don't listen to Google!

Prof Eileen Barker of the London School of Economics, who has spent years studying groups like the Moonies and Scientologists, says there are similarities between OneCoin and messianic millennium cults, where people believe they are part of something big that is going to change the world - and no matter what the evidence, once they've signed up, it's very hard for them to admit they are wrong.

You think, 'Wait a bit longer. Money might push people to invest in the first place, but the sense of belonging, of doing something, of achieving something, is why they stay, Barker says.

In an ideal world, regulators would take action to protect consumers from scams like OneCoin. But the authorities all over the world have been slow to react, partly because the whole area of cryptocurrencies is relatively new.

Less than a year later, the warning was removed from the website. Game over. The fact that OneCoin was operating internationally also created difficulties for the authorities.

Such explanations don't offer much comfort to those affected. She now runs Whatsapp support groups for OneCoin investors who realise they have been swindled.

Where's the help? More folk are going to promote this. It's a green light for the OneCoin scammers to continue and extort more money from innocent people in the UK and nothing has been done about it.

They don't care! The City of London Police told the BBC: "There was insufficient evidence to support criminal proceedings against individuals based in the UK, though the force has never specified that there had been no concerns surrounding OneCoin.

The force has provided assistance to foreign law enforcement partners in respect of their investigations concerning OneCoin personnel and will continue to do this.

If you believe you have been a victim of fraud in relation to OneCoin or you suspect someone of actively marketing OneCoin, please come forward and report it to Action Fraud online.

Until this week, however, the OneCoin head office remained open for business - and people were continuing to promote the currency.

Today doors are locked. No lights visible through the windows. End of Twitter post by Svrakata. In the Ntangamo region of Uganda, not far from Rwandan border, most people make their living growing bananas, or sometimes cassava, sweet potato, beans or groundnut.

He already had , shillings in savings, and to raise the rest he returned from the capital, Kampala, to his family home, took three goats raised by his younger brothers, and sold them.

Daniel is one of thousands of Ugandans who've bought into Dr Ruja's fake cryptocurrency - and the OneCoin financial documents leaked to the BBC reveal that as time went on, investors like him became increasingly important to OneCoin.

In Europe, less money was invested in the first six months of compared to the same period in But in Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent, it was the other way round.

As the money started drying up in Europe, promoters turned more and more to countries like Uganda. Daniel took me and Georgia to meet Prudence, who first introduced him to OneCoin.

They are still friends, even though both now realise it's a scam. Prudence is a nurse in a Kampala slum, who thought she could make more money selling OneCoin and set about recruiting new investors.

A senior promoter gave her a nice car to impress customers, and instructed her to visit farmers when their crops were being harvested and they had money in their pocket.

People in villages trust people from the city, Prudence tells us. To buy the packages some sold their cattle, their land and even their houses - with disastrous consequences.

Some are running because they got loans from a bank. Some are hiding. Some are divorced. If anyone asks Prudence when the investment is going to deliver the promised riches, she tells them to wait.

She can't bring herself to tell them the truth. I don't want those people I introduced into OneCoin to see me moving around.

They can easily kill me. They thought I ate their money. But though she has stopped recruiting, many others haven't, and there are still plenty of interested buyers, she says.

One of the main OneCoin offices in Kampala is attached to a church. There are videos of the minister, known as Bishop Fred, leading the congregation in call and response.

Bishop Fred, we learned, is now one of the country's top promoters of OneCoin, though he says it's no longer promoted during church services.

As in other countries, OneCoin has spread here through networks of friends and families. Together with Daniel, Georgia and I travel south to meet his mother.

She lives in a concrete house with a tin roof - five small rooms, a small television and a cooking area.

A towel covers the front door, and a few metres away is her land, where she grows her own food and sells anything left over at the local market.

But when Daniel found out about OneCoin, it suddenly seemed like a much better alternative. His mother had doubts, but he persuaded her to put the money into OneCoin instead.

She had no computer or smartphone, to do her own research. She doesn't speak English either, so I'm shocked to discover, as we sit and talk, that Daniel has never actually told his mother that the money is lost.

They keep postponing this. That I don't know what they're thinking. Maybe it's just a delay. Daniel's mother then tells us that when she first saw me and Georgia, she assumed it was a good sign - that perhaps it meant that her money was going to arrive at last.

She asks what news we have about OneCoin. Will she get her money back? He doesn't seem certain it's a good idea. Perhaps it would put him in an uncomfortable position.

I don't want to be the person that breaks the news to Daniel's mother. Georgia suggests we tell Daniel's mother that we are journalists, and that we are investigating OneCoin because a lot of people aren't getting their money.

If it doesn't happen, life is hard. When we started planning the Missing Cryptoqueen podcast in late , no-one really had a clue what happened to Dr Ruja after her disappearance.

It was only earlier this year that the US authorities revealed she'd flown to Athens on 25 October And even then, the question remained, where had she gone next?

There were rumours of course - lots of them.

Dr Ruja Ignatova

Dr Ruja Ignatova Video

!! WARNING !! ONECOIN “BIGGEST CRYPTO SCAM” RUN BY MISSING CRYPTO QUEEN

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